The idea of how to illuminate it sparked from the revelation of how incredibly beautiful the piece actually was in itself.
 
Photo taken at Red Rock Loop Road in Sedona, Arizona on a road trip by car, going from San Fransisco to Miami.

Photo taken at Red Rock Loop Road in Sedona, Arizona on a road trip by car, going from San Fransisco to Miami.

 

The 59th Signature by Rusty Remakes. I got a little obsessed with the show American Pickers on History Channel in autumn 2012, after our first road trip through the United States. From one of those episodes I learned there was an American historic piece called a hay carrier (or hay trolley). I just had to get one. 

 
Step 1: adding a sturdy chain in matching color and material. 

Step 1: adding a sturdy chain in matching color and material. 

Early work in progress picture, trying to pair the trolley with a matching red phonograph horn. 

Early work in progress picture, trying to pair the trolley with a matching red phonograph horn. 

 

This particular specimen was the very first trolley I bought. I remember bidding fiercely for it in an online auction from my cell phone, from the backseat of a taxi in the middle of the night. As soon as the trolley arrived I fell in love instantly. The weight, the colors, the details... With no hesitation, I immediately bought another one which ended up as a lamp in our living room. 

The color combination red and silver is a killer and the industrial, yet quite ornate look of it, is both rare and stunning. Still, turning it into a lamp was quite the challenge, due to its shapes and proportions. I tried many different ideas (for instance, paring it with a red phonograph horn) but it never felt right. Eventually it ended up in the storage space, laying there for a good year and a half.

 
 

It wasn’t until three years later that I came up with the idea of adding lights to it in a more minimalist way. By that time, it had hung in the ceiling of our apartment for another year, “unlit”, and the idea of how to illuminate it sparked from the revelation of how incredibly beautiful the piece actually was in itself.

Sometimes, it’s better to just subtly highlight the raw beauty of history, rather than overtly transforming things into lamps.